Dr Michal Wlodarski, Principal

Life Sciences

Michal is a Principal in CamIn's Life Sciences division where he drives business development and sales to identify, evaluate, and integrate emerging technologies, valuable assets, and high growth applications to strategically strengthen his clients' portfolios. Michal has over seven years of professional experience in academic and professional roles in the industry, including his work with GlaxoSmithKline, University College London, and for the NHS in England. At CamIn, he leads technology innovation projects for C-level executives and Heads of Innovation at global Life Science industrials and start-ups. Michal has received a first-class Master of Pharmacy honours degree from UCL and a PhD degree in Biophysics from the University of Cambridge. Michal is fluent in Polish.

Some of his recent work for clients includes investigating sustainable and organic alternatives to agrochemical treatments, assisting clients with their expansion into emerging genome editing technology areas, and helping his clients “future-proof” their plant breeding processes with next-generation data collection and analytics.

Michal is passionate about the Life Science industry and the impact that new technologies can make on companies that are seeking to develop leaner processes and better products. He recognises that although innovations in science and technology are constantly occurring in research groups at universities, the transfer of this knowledge to the industries that need it most remains woefully inefficient. His mission at CamIn is to realise the full potential of cutting-edge developments in bioscience and technology, and lead his clients to the most effective innovations that can address their goals.

Michal is fluent in English and Polish. Michal is passionate about teaching and serves as a visiting lecturer at UCL School of Management where he mentors graduate MSc students on their business case analysis projects. In his free time, Michal enjoys playing Badminton and Chess.

EDUCATION

MSc Pharmacy

University College London

PhD Biophysics

University of Cambridge

CONNECT WITH MICHAL

m.wlodarski [at] camin.com

+44 (0)7555 7953 50

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grand challenge 1

RESTRICTIVE BANS ON AGROCHEMICALS

Agrochemical companies are facing new challenges due to increasingly stringent regulations on their products, and in some cases, outright bans on the use of certain types of chemicals (e.g., paraquat, chlorothalonil, ethoprophos, neonicotinoids). As these actions will result in shrinking portfolios and declines in revenue, agrochemical companies must look for viable alternatives to their most controversial active ingredients, and will need to expand their search for substitutes or replacements to include other industrial sectors and other areas of science (e.g. pharmaceuticals and food). There is an urgent need for new technological paradigms that could strengthen crops and improve their resistance to stressors without the use of agrochemicals. In addressing these challenges, it will be important to consider biotechnology and new genetic modification techniques, which can improve crops’ most desirable traits (e.g. nutritional profile, texture, shape, etc.) and strengthen their inherent ability to resist key pests and diseases.

grand challenge 2

GROWING PRESSURES AGAINST CONVENTIONAL AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES AND INCREASING EFFORTS TO SUPPORT NATURAL OR ORGANIC ALTERNATIVES

There is an increasing demand among consumers for naturally or organically grown food products. These products are often perceived as being “healthier” than those grown using conventional methods, which can include treating crops with herbicides or pesticides. In addition to consumers’ fears of being exposed to potentially harmful agricultural chemicals through their food, more stringent controls have been placed on the use of agrochemical agents to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment. Companies now face threats, including reductions in revenue, increases in litigation costs, and significant reputational risks, unless they can find ways to contribute to cleaner and more sustainable agricultural practices. As a result, many are now expanding their technology portfolios to include products that are more compatible with sustainable farming practices, including precision farming tools, organic or natural materials, and biotechnology-mediated waste management.

grand challenge 3

INEFFICIENCIES IN R&D AND PLANT CULTIVATION OPERATIONS

There is a growing global demand for food produce and more sophisticated varieties of fruits, vegetables, grasses, flowers, and wheat. Plant breeding and cultivation techniques have become more complex, and will require a step-change improvement in operations efficiency. This sector is also undergoing consolidation, with the largest companies competing on margins and market share, and creating challenging conditions for newer, more specialised businesses. All types of companies must find ways to significantly optimise their R&D processes, as well as their production throughput and efficiency, or face reduced profitability. Novel data capture devices (e.g. modern sensors, near/short infra-red cameras) and predictive analytics (e.g. biostatistics tools, -omics datasets, machine learning supported tools) will make these critical leaps in efficiency possible, and help companies respond effectively to these pressures. Rapid improvements are likely to be found through the development of next generation breeding methods (simulation and modelling based), plant sampling automation, biomonitoring, and connected planning capabilities.

FOOD & AGRICULTURE

Next generation plant breeding;
Biological seed treatments;
Nanotechnology-based gene delivery;
Plant microbiome manipulation;
Drone imaging for field biomonitoring; etc.

FAST-MOVING CONSUMER GOODS

Sugar & carbohydrates substitutes;
Novel formulations;
Smart materials for packaging;
Non-thermal processing methods;
Traceability & shelf monitoring, etc.

MEDICAL DEVICES

E-health applications;
Wearables;
Robotic surgery;
Virtual reality for R&D and surgery
3D bioprinting, etc.

PHARMACEUTICALS

Machine learning for drug discovery;
Precision drug delivery and smart release;
Cell & gene therapeutics;
IoT for pharma manufacturing;
Immunotherapeutics; etc. 

Our industries of focus in Life Sciences.

LIFE SCIENCES

GLOBAL Cosmetics MNC

Technology landscaping and forecasting of photo-protector specialty chemicals and formulations for sunscreen applications.

 

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LIFE SCIENCES

EU FOOD MNC

Market-pull and technology-push analysis of food technologies for dysphagia and anorexia followed by in-depth product innovation strategy.

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LIFE SCIENCES

US BIOPHARMA SME

Advanced therapy area landscaping, forecasting and scouting for specific CNS applications and preclinical development support.

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LIFE SCIENCES

EU MEDTECH SME

Identified approval pathways for the commercialisation and the competitive advantage of our client's medical device, and scouted for manufacturing partners.

 

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Our most recent projects in Life Sciences.

Our most recent µInsight in Life Sciences.

Innovating Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

SUMMARY

The pharmaceutical industry is at a critical point, facing rapidly evolving social, healthcare, technological, and regulatory landscapes, as well as more informed and demanding patient groups. In response to these pressures, leaner drug development pipelines and manufacturing processes need to be developed and implemented, with the goal of increasing product quality, process agility, and operational cost-efficiency.
In the context of chemical manufacturing technologies, there has been little de novo innovation. Instead, most new process solutions either build on existing techniques (e.g. flow chemistry and capsule filling) or repurpose know-how from other disciplines (e.g. 3D printing and hot-melt extrusion). The next generation of pharmaceutical manufacturing systems, however, will be more tightly integrated with digital technologies and process analytical technologies (PATs).
PATs range from quality and risk management tools to process monitoring tools, and are particularly relevant for improving process efficiency, adaptability, robustness, and scalability. PATs accomplish these improvements through integration with innovative manufacturing techniques and technologies, including continuous manufacturing and the expanded use of lab robots. The overwhelming amounts of data generated by PATs will require new cloud-based and intelligent data management systems, such as the Internet-of-Things (IoT) infrastructure, to be properly managed. In addition, the cybersecurity of these systems will need to be ensured, and could rely on innovations such as blockchain technologies to track and validate data generated from production processes.
The synthesis of small molecule active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is usually achieved through flow chemistry. PATs will also be important in these applications, as this method depends on microreactor systems. PATs can help maintain rigorous control of reaction conditions, which is essential when performing unstable reactions or using potentially hazardous compounds.
New techniques used in the final stage of manufacturing or moulding pharmaceutical products—including 3D printing, hot-melt extrusion, injection moulding, and capsule filling—all possess certain benefits and drawbacks, but have the potential to meet the growing need for more personalised, on-demand medicines.

 

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